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  1. IBtiM

    Candelabra: Estoscerro

    Candelabra: Estoscerro is a 3-D style, action-adventure, dungeon crawler in which the heroes from the games "The Mad Wizard", "The Scarlet Matron", and "The Warlord Slayer" band together in a quest compelled by the king. Exploration within a maze environment while battling enemies and enemy bosses are the fundamentals of the game. Your journey will be complete upon reaching the plateau's top and finding the Candelabra. Candelabra: Estoscerro is uniquely played with two NES controllers, one in each hand, or with a modified Virtual Boy controller (Similar to SoleGooseProductions' Spook-O-Tron). Diagrams of the controller format are pictured, but further depth can be found in the in-game manual, or available to view on the Sly Dog Studios website. Modified Virtual Boy controllers are not available on this campaign, but a tutorial will provided demonstrating how to make the alteration. Features: 3-D Style Action Adventure First ever NES homebrew Dungeon Crawler Developed by Sly Dog Studios

    © The 6502 Collective

  2. IBtiM

    Rollie

    Rollie: Rollie and Lorrie are on a mission to save their forest, Paradise Gorge. Their goal is to defeat the brats and bullies who have seized power in the midst of an unstable ecosystem precipitated by a sudden overpopulation of snakes. They aim to lead as examples, to show how sharing and sacrifice are rewarding, and that rampant self-serving brutality perpetuates destruction. Rollie has 16 huge stages of gameplay. Power-ups and secrets can be found scattered throughout the levels and checkpoints exist along the way. Each stage ends in a boss battle. Rollie's signature mechanic is his ability to curl up into a bouncy ball. Rolling and bouncing provide the player a unique way to move across levels freely. Rollie features a large assortment of power-ups and secondary abilities. This makes the game dynamic by giving the player various options to overcome obstacles and enemies. Many of the power-ups and items are hidden in flowers scattered throughout the stages or can be dropped by enemies. These special abilities include: Features: Jumping on top of enemies Throwing marbles Blowing bubbles that operate as moving platforms A rolling attack Ways to befriend enemies Collecting clovers to help earn extra lives Several power-ups that temporarily aid the player Developed by Optovania

    © The 6502 Collective

  3. IBtiM

    Trophy

    Trophy: A brand-new action platformer for the original NES! Take control of the robot Trophy in this exciting new homebrew game. Save the peaceful planet of Gearus 9 from the evil machinations of Lord Q as you run, jump, and blast your way to victory. Collect power-ups along the way and defeat some of the largest bosses ever seen on the NES! As Trophy, you must navigate challenging environmental obstacles and terrain, such as water, snow, moving platforms, and even zero gravity. Collect power-ups and upgrade Trophy's health and weapon systems, all while battling enemies throughout the levels. Be prepared, though, as at the end of each level you will have to square off against one of the largest bosses ever seen on the NES! Features: Nine levels of intense, platforming action Diverse environments and terrain Large, fully-scrolling levels Hidden areas and power-ups Cut-scene narrative segments Password system Nine GIANT bosses Developed by Gradual Games

    © The 6502 Collective

  4. IBtiM

    Trophy

    Trophy: A brand-new action platformer for the original NES! Take control of the robot Trophy in this exciting new homebrew game. Save the peaceful planet of Gearus 9 from the evil machinations of Lord Q as you run, jump, and blast your way to victory. Collect power-ups along the way and defeat some of the largest bosses ever seen on the NES! As Trophy, you must navigate challenging environmental obstacles and terrain, such as water, snow, moving platforms, and even zero gravity. Collect power-ups and upgrade Trophy's health and weapon systems, all while battling enemies throughout the levels. Be prepared, though, as at the end of each level you will have to square off against one of the largest bosses ever seen on the NES! Features: Nine levels of intense, platforming action Diverse environments and terrain Large, fully-scrolling levels Hidden areas and power-ups Cut-scene narrative segments Password system Nine GIANT bosses Developed by Gradual Games

    © The 6502 Collective

  5. IBtiM

    Trophy

    Trophy: A brand-new action platformer for the original NES! Take control of the robot Trophy in this exciting new homebrew game. Save the peaceful planet of Gearus 9 from the evil machinations of Lord Q as you run, jump, and blast your way to victory. Collect power-ups along the way and defeat some of the largest bosses ever seen on the NES! As Trophy, you must navigate challenging environmental obstacles and terrain, such as water, snow, moving platforms, and even zero gravity. Collect power-ups and upgrade Trophy's health and weapon systems, all while battling enemies throughout the levels. Be prepared, though, as at the end of each level you will have to square off against one of the largest bosses ever seen on the NES! Features: Nine levels of intense, platforming action Diverse environments and terrain Large, fully-scrolling levels Hidden areas and power-ups Cut-scene narrative segments Password system Nine GIANT bosses Developed by Gradual Games

    © The 6502 Collective

  6. IBtiM

    Candelabra Estoscerro

    Candelabra: Estoscerro is a 3-D style, action-adventure, dungeon crawler in which the heroes from the games "The Mad Wizard", "The Scarlet Matron", and "The Warlord Slayer" band together in a quest compelled by the king. Exploration within a maze environment while battling enemies and enemy bosses are the fundamentals of the game. Your journey will be complete upon reaching the plateau's top and finding the Candelabra. Candelabra: Estoscerro is uniquely played with two NES controllers, one in each hand, or with a modified Virtual Boy controller (Similar to SoleGooseProductions' Spook-O-Tron). Diagrams of the controller format are pictured, but further depth can be found in the in-game manual, or available to view on the Sly Dog Studios website. Modified Virtual Boy controllers are not available on this campaign, but a tutorial will provided demonstrating how to make the alteration. Features: 3-D Style Action Adventure First ever NES homebrew Dungeon Crawler Developed by Sly Dog Studios

    © The 6502 Collective

  7. 8BitRat

    January 2020

    © 8BitRat Consoles

  8. 8BitRat

    January 2020

    © 8BitRat Consoles

  9. 8BitRat

    January 2020

    © 8BitRat Consoles

  10. 8BitRat

    January 2020

    © 8BitRat Consoles

  11. 8BitRat

    January 2020

    © 8BitRat Consoles

  12. 8BitRat

    January 2020

    © 8BitRat Consoles

  13. 8BitRat

    January 2020

    © 8BitRat Consoles

  14. 8BitRat

    January 2020

    © 8BitRat Consoles

  15. SEGA GameGear Disassembly This guide will take you through the disassembly procedures of all 3 variants of the SEGA GameGear for cleaning and/or further repair. Table of Contents Hardware Notes Materials Required Tools, Parts, Additional Supplies Difficulty Time Estimate Console Variant Recognition GameGear Disassembly 1. Hardware Note: There are 3 variations of the SEGA GameGear that were released and this guide was originally based on the VA1. Any differences between VA1 and the VA5/VA5 variants will be noted below each step. 2. Materials Required: Tools: #00 Philips Head Screwdriver 4.5mm GameBit Tamper Proof Security Bit Specialty Scraping Tool (Can use small flat-head screwdriver) Parts: N/A Additional Supplies: N/A 3. Difficulty: Easy 4. Time Estimate: 25-30 Minutes 5. Console Variant Recognition: VA1: Smooth and flat screen cover with color “GameGear” logo in the top left. VA4: Smooth and rounded screen cover with color “GameGear” logo in the top left. VA5 / MAJESCO: Smooth and rounds screen cover with black and white “GameGear” logo in the top left. 6. Console Disassembly: Step 1: Flip the console face down. Step 2: Remove both battery covers, batteries, and game from console. Step 3: Unscrew (1) with the 4.5mm GameBit. Unscrew (2-7) with the #00 Philips screwdriver. Step 4: Gently unplug the cable connectors (1-3) from the audio & power boards. Step 5: Unscrew (1-12) with the #00 Philips screwdriver. Lift main board and set aside. (Note: Watch for the contrast wheel and the screen protector film as they can get stuck.) Step 6: Remove all buttons, D-pad, and screen protection film (1-5). Step 7: Unscrew (1-4) with the #00 Philips screwdriver, remove the metal shielding, and set it aside. Step 8: Unscrew (1-2) with the #00 Philips screwdriver from sound board. Remove the sound board and set it aside. (Note: Watch for the volume wheel as it can get stuck.) Step 9: Unscrew (1-2) with the #00 Philips screwdriver from power board. Pry the black plastic shield (3) with a flat head screwdriver or specialty tool. Remove the power board and set it aside. Complete: Clean and repair the console as required. To reassemble, reverse steps 1-9. (If you see anything incorrect or that you want added, feel free to comment below and the posting will be edited to reflect the corrections.)
  16. 8BitRat

    VA1

    © 8BitRat Consoles

  17. Sega GameGear: General Guides Below you will find general guides for everything from disassembly to full restores. Disassembly: If you need to do any work on your GameGear more than likely you will need to start here and then work with the repair guides below to fix any issues that might arise. Click HERE for the forum post OR Click the following for the PDF download. Disassembly - SEGA GameGear Cap Replacement: If your GameGear LCD Screen look washed out, dim, or lacking in contrast, if the sound is non-existent, or if it turns itself off randomly this repair guide could fix all of your issues. LINKS COMING SOON More guides coming soon... (If you see anything incorrect or that you want added, feel free to comment below and the posting will be edited to reflect the corrections.)
  18. Sega Pioneer LaserActive: PACs of Fun! This innovative machine could do just about anything when it comes to entertainment. Though we have listed the LaserActive with the Sega consoles, we have done so only because the system plays Sega titles. The device was manufactured by a company named Pioneer. Playing music, karaoke, interactive software and thousands of movies were all included in the all-inclusive entertainment system. Released in October of 1993, this rare device allowed people to play games on Laserdiscs (what came before the DVD) and arcade games. You may be thinking that this device couldn’t possibly be considered a video game console. However, because it was capable of supporting add on devices called LD-ROMs, which allowed people access to various Sega games. This was the first pack of many which allowed the LaserActive to be integrated with several other consoles already on the market. When the device was released, it was the closest available to integrate nearly every kind of multimedia entertainment form in its time. It was extremely expensive, and primarily competed with the 3DO consoles, though it far surpassed their abilities. While the LaserActive cannot play standalone games, it has several expansion PACs which provide excellent game play. With the expansion packs, one can play Sega Genesis, Sega CD, Mega LD, Laserkaraoke, and more. Unfortunately, the Sega Pioneer LaserActive was not as popular as one would hope for such an extravagant machine. The first issue was the high price; the device was sold at $970 in the US, much higher than a typical console. The other issue is that the LaserDisc technology proved to be insufficient for storing video data. The discs could only hold about an hour’s worth of video, which caused users to have to switch discs too often. It was meant to be a successor to VHS technology, but it wasn’t quite advanced enough, and was quickly replaced by the DVD. Because of the failure of the technology, the LaserActive was discontinued as soon as the mid-90s. Pioneer continued, however, to manufacture low-cost players until 2009. Now imagine if they would have been able to release something like this today with PACs from Microsoft, Sony, Nintendo, and maybe even a Dreamer from Sega… It could have been smaller, cheaper, and the consoles manufactures of today would just have to build a PAC giving them time to focus more on releasing good games. ~Vic Sega Pioneer LaserActive - Model: PAC-S10/PAC-S1) ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: ??? Original Release - This module was released by Sega and Pioneer, and it allowed consumers to play games on 8-inch and 12-inch LaserActive Mega LD discs. It also supported the hundreds of already existing Mega Drive and Mega CD games. This was by far the most popular add-on for LaserActive owners. NEC PAC - Model: PAC-N10/PAC-N1 ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: ??? The NEC PAC gave users the opportunity to play 8” and 12” LaserActive LD-ROMs, Engine CD discs, HuCards and CD-G discs. While this wasn’t the most popular model in its time, it is now one of the most sought-after add-ons by collectors today. Karaoke PAC - Model: PAC-K10/PAC-K1 ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: ??? If it was karaoke you were looking for, this was the PAC for you. With this add-on, users could play all NTSC LaserKaraoke titles. It includes two microphone inputs, volume controls and tone controls. Computer Interface PAC (PAC-PC1) ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: ??? This PAC allowed PC and Macintosh computer users to control their CLD-A100 from their computer. It included a 330-button remote control, the LaserActive Program Editor and several sample programs. LaserActive 3-D Goggles (GOL-1) ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: ??? This add-on allowed your 3-D CLD-A100 games to come to life using 3-D goggles. This system was compatible with the Sega Master System as well, as the Master System used identical connectors. Unit Lifetime: 1993-1996 Generation: Fourth Generation Introductory Price: $970 USD Units Sold (Worldwide): Around 10,000 Authorized Games Released (Worldwide): N/A Backwards Compatibility: PC Engine, PC Engine CD-ROM, Mega-CD, Mega Drive Media Type: LD-ROM, CD-ROM, ROM Cartridge (If you see anything incorrect or that you want added, feel free to comment below and the posting will be edited to reflect the corrections.)
  19. Sega Nomad: Now, There Are No Limits After the Mega Jet, the unique so-called “handheld console” designed for airlines, was released by Sega, they quickly began working on the Sega Nomad. Seeing success in the market of handheld consoles for other competitors in the market, Sega designed the Sega Nomad to compete with products like the Nintendo Gameboy. The Sega Nomad, unlike many other Sega products, was only released in North America and was never officially released world-wide. Due to the timing of its release, the console had no titles packed-in itself, but utilized the library of over 500 Genesis titles. Due to a number of factors, the success of the Sega Nomad was limited. Sega themselves, as a company, was overly focused on the marketing and development of the Sega Saturn, which left the Sega Nomad under-supported. Additionally, many Genesis peripherals like the Power Base Converter and the Sega CD were incompatible with the Sega Nomad. Originally, Sega wanted to employee the relatively new technology of touch screens for the Sega Nomad. However, because of the large price tag for this technology at this time, they stuck with more standard handheld console features. The Nomad was officially released in North America in 1995. According to insiders, Sega had little plans in place to market the Nomad, as five different consoles were being supported by the company at the time: Saturn, Genesis, Game Gear, Pico and Master System. With Sega’s hopes that the Saturn would be more successful than Sony’s Playstation, Sega paid much of its attention to this product rather than marketing any of their other systems. Many collectors attribute the fall of Sega as a first party producer to be the sheer number of systems they produced in a limited time frame along with the lack of real marketing for most of them. While the Sega Nomad does not have its own game library, it does enjoy over 500 games which are available for the Genesis/Mega Drive. Additionally, the nomad is able to boot bootleg, unlicensed and home-brew games which have been created for the Genesis/Mega-Drive. The Sega Nomad was not particularly successful, and it landed the GamePro list of the 10 Worst-Selling Handhelds of All Time”. The biggest contributors to its failure were poor timing in the market, inadequate advertising and bad battery life. ~Vic Sega Nomad - Model: MK-6100 ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: 1995 Original Release - The only model of the nomad released by Sega. This product could be plugged in or used wirelessly with 6 AA batteries. You could also plug more than one nomad together for a two player game or hook it to the TV and play there. Unit Lifetime: 1995 - 1997 Units Sold (Worldwide): 1 Million Authorized Games Released (Worldwide): No pack-in, 500+ Genesis titles Backwards Compatibility: N/A Media Type: Sega Genesis Cartridges Resolution: 320 x 224 Colors Available: 512 Colors on Screen: 64 Screen Size: 3.125 in Sound Output (All Models): 6-Channel Stereo (If you see anything incorrect or that you want added, feel free to comment below and the posting will be edited to reflect the corrections.)
  20. Sega Pico: The Computer that Thinks it’s a Toy Somewhere along the line, Sega came up with the idea to design a console which is explicitly for children. The Sega Pico, also known as the Kids Computer Pico, was a video game console which was designed to be educational entertainment, or, as marketed “edutainment”. The system was designed for children between the ages of 3 and 7 years old. It was released in 1993 in Japan, 1994 in North America and Europe and later in China. The Sega Pico was quite popular in Japan and was sold continuously through 1993 to 2005 when its successor, the Advanced Pico Beena, was released. However, sales were not nearly as good in North America and Europe and the product was discontinued there in 1998. Ultimately 3.4 million Pico consoles have been sold along with 11.2 million game cartridges. In order to design games which were especially appealing to young children, Sega was able to use licensed franchised animated characters such as Disney characters and its own Sonic the Hedgehog. The Pico was designed in the image of a laptop, and came with a stylus pen, or “magic pen”. The magic pen functioned as a mouse which allowed the child to select buttons on the screen of the console. Children are able to draw or even animate characters directly on the screen. The game cartridges were called “storyware”, and each one provided children a “picture book” game that gives a series of tasks and an option to turn the page. Sounds, voices and music accompanied each page, and most of the games featured learning activities including music counting, spelling, reading, matching and coloring. Games include Disney’s The Lion King and A Year at Pooh Corner. Additionally, games with the Sega mascot, Sonic, were featured as well. The Pico received a good bit of good press in certain parts of the world. Joseph Szadkowski of the Washington Times said “Pico has enough power to be a serious learning aid that teaches counting, spelling, matching, problem solving, memory, logic, hand/eye coordination and important, basic computer skills”. However, despite these reviews, North America fully rejected the Pico, which failed, some say, due to a lack of credibility. ~Vic Sega Pico - Model: MK-49002 ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: 1994 Original Release - This is the standard model which is very similar to the Japanese HPC-0007 model of the Sega Pico. The only big difference between this model and the Japanese model is that it has a cyan/purple color scheme. Sega Pico - Model: MK-49325 ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: 1999 Original Release - Majesco was given the rights to the older Sega consoles, and in response they designed this 1999 version of the Sega Pico. This version was simply cheaper to manufacture, and it doesn’t include the Sega logo. Unit Lifetime: 1993-2005 Units Sold (Worldwide): 3.4 Million Authorized Games Released (Worldwide): 300+ Introductory Price: $139 (If you see anything incorrect or that you want added, feel free to comment below and the posting will be edited to reflect the corrections.)
  21. Sega Mega Jet: Fly with SEGA! In 1993, Sega had an innovative idea which led to the development of the Sega Mega Jet. This strange console was designed to be an entertainment system for Japanese Airlines which were used as in-flight entertainment. The Sega Mega Jet was a handheld with no screen and had to be connected to a mounted TV. Japanese airplanes included televisions for each armrest, so the system was designed for players to utilize these small personal TVs. Only four games were available for the flight version of the product, including Sonic the Hedgehog. However, because standard Mega Drive cartridges worked with this product, passengers were also allowed to bring in their own games. Sega did not limit the Mega Jet to airplanes - a consumer version of the product was also released in 1994, but still had to be connected to another screen. While the success of the Sega Mega Jet was limited, largely due to its limited functionality, it did lay the groundwork for future technological innovation in the Sega industry. The Sega Nomad, the second fully functional handheld console designed by Sega, had a lot of features to thank the Sega Mega Jet for. Part of the issue of this product was that it was marketed as a handheld console, but in practice it was really anything but. While you may have the controller in your hand, because the console had no screen, it still had to be connected with bulky materials to a screen somewhere else. It had none of the conveniences of a handheld console, but was still marketed as such. This product had its best successes in the airline industry, where its concept was fairly useful. Further, it served as a great introduction product for new handheld consoles that Sega would release later. In the end, the Sega Mega Jet is one of the most innovative handheld console concepts that have come out of the video game industry. It is extremely rare today, and the majority of Mega Jets are now owned by private collectors all around the world. ~Vic Sega Mega Jet - Model: MK-6100 ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: 1994 Original Release - While there was only one model number released of the Sega Mega jet, the product was first only sold to Japanese airlines as passenger entertainment. However, it was later released to the general public. Unit Lifetime: ??? Units Sold (Worldwide): ??? Authorized Games Released (US): ??? Backwards Compatibility: ??? Media Type: Cartridge Resolution: ??? Colors Available: ??? Colors on Screen: ??? Sound Output (All Models): ??? Power Requirements (All Models): ??? (If you see anything incorrect or that you want added, feel free to comment below and the posting will be edited to reflect the corrections.)
  22. Sega GameGear: Welcome to the Next Level On October 9th, 1990, the Sega GameGear was released to the public in Japan. The following year, it was released in North America and Europe, and was released in 1992 in Australia. The handheld system was designed to compete with the Nintendo Game Boy, Atari Lynx and NEC Turbo Express. The hardware included a full-color backlit screen and landscaping format, which led Sega to position the GameGear as superior to the GameBoy. Because of the library of games and affordable price, the GameGear was immediately good competition to the Atari Lynx and TurboExpress, despite being rushed to the market. It fell short, however, in competing with the GameBoy, because it suffered from short battery life and weak support from its parent company, Sega. When Sega began to see its sales decline as a result of Nintendo putting a handheld console on the market, they quickly began to design the GameGear. One of their tactics to make a great product in a short amount of time was to base the hardware of the GameGear on the hardware of the Master System. This was intended to allow Master System games to port to the Game Gear. While the GameGear was certainly designed with more technical capability, the sacrifice of battery life led it to be an inferior option to the Gameboy to many consumers. The Game Boy was capable of running for over 20 hours on four AA batteries while the Game Gear could only run for three to five hours with 6 AA batteries. One of the issues that led to the decline of the Game Gear was the lack of attention to it paid by Sega. At the same time that the GameGear was being marketed, the company was also trying to support the Sega CD and Sega 32X home systems, and design a new home console system, the Sega Saturn. After the decline of the Game Gear, which was discontinued in 1996, Sega designed the Genesis Nomad, the last handheld console the company Sega would release. Over three hundred games were released for the Game Gear, including big names such as Sonic the Hedgehog, The GG Shinobi and The Land of Illusion Starring Mickey Mouse. ~Vic Sega GameGear - Model: 2110 ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: 1991 Original Release - Other than a slightly different sports version with the same model number, this was the only version of the GameGear released. The variations of this model include one with a jet black case and a few limited edition models sold in Japan. The most common problem associated with this model is an issue with the sound output chip. In addition, some complain that players have to angle the screen too much for good viewing. Unit Lifetime: 1991 - 1997 Units Sold (Worldwide): 11 Million Authorized Games Released (Worldwide): 390 Backwards Compatibility: N/A Media Type: Cartridge Resolution: 160 x 146 Colors Available: 4096 Colors on Screen: 32 Screen Size: 3.2” Sound Output (All Models): 4 Layer Stereo Power Requirements (All Models): 6 AA Batteries or 10v 850amps (If you see anything incorrect or that you want added, feel free to comment below and the posting will be edited to reflect the corrections.)
  23. 8BitRat

    SNK: A Brief History

    SNK: The Future is Now SNK Corporation is a video game hardware and software company which has been doing business since the 1970s. The company began when Eikichi Kawasaki witnessed the growth of the video game market, in particular coin-operated games. The first successful games were Vanguard and Safari Rally, and after these successes, the company moved on to form a division in North America. The company ended in 2001, but was rebirthed later that year by sister company Playmore, Kawasaki’s new company. The most notable gaming system created by SNK Corporation was the Neo Geo, a cartridge-based arcade system board which was part of the fourth generation of video game consoles. It was originally launched as a coin operated arcade game which had the capability of supporting six different cartridges at the same time. This was a unique feature which found the Neo Geo success in arcades, as it saved space and money by supporting multiple games at once. Later, a home console version of Neo Geo was released called the AES (Advanced Entertainment System). The controllers for the Neo Geo kept close to its arcade roots, complete with a joystick and four main buttons. The Neo Geo was one of the most powerful consoles on the market in its arcade form, but the home console was considerably less powerful. All in all, the console received good reviews and was named the 19th best console of all time by IGN. The total number of games released for the Neo Geo system, including arcade cabinets, was 148. ~Vic (If you see anything incorrect or that you want added, feel free to comment below and the posting will be edited to reflect the corrections.)
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